Feb 21, 2012
31 notes
Feb 21, 2012
4 notes
phileche:

Many people are unclear about what public health is and what individuals in the field do. I think this graphic is a good visual.

phileche:

Many people are unclear about what public health is and what individuals in the field do. I think this graphic is a good visual.

Feb 21, 2012
1 note

A central issue…

from The Huff Post: “I was talking about the radical environmentalists,” Santorum said, suggesting that they believe man should protect the earth, rather than “steward its resources.” “I think that is a phony idea. I don’t believe that’s what we’re here to do…We’re not here to serve the earth. That is not the objective, man is the objective.”

I don’t know what others think, but the concept laid out above is possibly the most fundamental and most frightening paradigm put forward by the radical right in the United States. Over the years, in bits and pieces, it has become clear that ravaging the planet is not, at all, a problem for these folks. They are looking for the “end times” be it at the hands of humans or something else. Why do I think that this is so important? Because it informs their response to so many issues: fracking, oil drilling, Israel, Iran, the environment, regulation/oversight, foreign aid, Islam, etc.

This is a critical issue that should alone make a person unelectable in the United States of America- it is based in religious fundamentalism, not politics, knowledge, wisdom or the hopes and desires of the the overwhelming majority of Americas. The problem is that no one talks about it as the major issue that it is. I hope that is noticed and discussed as the insanity that it is.

I want a healthy planet for my kids and grandkids and so on. If these folks want the apocalypse, let it be at the hand of God, and not from the hand of man.

Jan 23, 2012
349 notes

good:

Either musician Andrew Shum is extremely talented or extremely bored, or both…

Nevertheless this is awesome! 

laughingsquid:

House(hold) Beat, A Song Created From Household Sounds

Jan 19, 2012
26 notes
likelyhealthy:

Lack of Access to Health Care Vs. Terrorism.  Which kills more?

likelyhealthy:

Lack of Access to Health Care Vs. Terrorism.  Which kills more?

Jan 15, 2012
67 notes
cranquis:

A ground-breaking “infographic” by none other than THE Florence Nightingale. This particular one clearly displays the statistics which showed that more soldiers were dying from disease instead of wounds during the Crimean War.
Click the pic for more info about it, including some nifty “interactive” versions of the graphic.

Nightingale was kickin’ it from way back…

cranquis:

A ground-breaking “infographic” by none other than THE Florence Nightingale. This particular one clearly displays the statistics which showed that more soldiers were dying from disease instead of wounds during the Crimean War.

Click the pic for more info about it, including some nifty “interactive” versions of the graphic.

Nightingale was kickin’ it from way back…

Jan 15, 2012
38 notes

(Source: pubhealth)

Jan 13, 2012
81 notes

I vote for kimchee lunch

healthycal:

SCHOOL LUNCHES FROM AROUND THE WORLD:

Can you guess the national origins of these school lunches? We’ll give you a hint… the U.S. loves feeding our youth processed, pre-packaged foods with little nutritional value. 

(via pubhealth)

Jan 9, 2012
5 notes

Totally-drug resistant tuberculosis in India

from Maryn McKenna’s Superbug blog on Wired:

Well, this is a bad way to start the year.

Over the past 48 hours, news has broken in India of the existence of at least 12 patients infected with tuberculosis that has become resistant to all the drugs used against the disease. Physicians in Mumbai are calling the strain TDR, for Totally Drug-Resistant. In other words, it is untreatable as far as they know.

News of some of the cases was published Dec. 21 in an ahead-of-print letter to the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases, which just about everyone missed, including me. (But not, thankfully, the hyper-alert global-health blogger Crawford Kilian, to whom I hat-tip.) That letter describes the discovery and treatment of four cases of TDR-TB since last October. On Saturday, the Times of India disclosed that there are actually 12 known cases just in one hospital, the P. D. Hinduja National Hospital and Medical Research Centre; in the article, Hinduja’s Dr. Amita Athawale admits, “The cases we clinically isolate are just the tip of the iceberg.” And as a followup, the Hindustan Times reported yesterday that most hospitals in the city — by extension, most Indian cities — don’t have the facilities to identify the TDR strain, making it more likely that unrecognized cases can go on to infect others.

Why this is bad news: TB is already one of the world’s worst killers, up there with malaria and HIV/AIDS, accounting for 9.4 million cases and 1.7 million deaths in 2009, according to the WHO. At the best of times, TB treatment is difficult, requiring at least 6 months of pill combinations that have unpleasant side effects and must be taken long after the patient begins to feel well.

Because of the mismatch between treatment and symptoms, people often don’t take their full course of drugs — and from that (and some other factors I’ll talk about in a minute) we get multi-drug resistant and extensively drug-resistant, MDR and XDR, TB. MDR is resistant to the first-choice drugs, requiring that patients instead be treated with a larger cocktail of “second-line” agents, which are less effective, have more side effects, and take much longer to effect a cure, sometimes 2 years or more. XDR is resistant to the three first-line drugs and several of the nine or so drugs usually recognized as being second choice.

As of last spring, according to the WHO, there were about 440,000 cases of MDR-TB per year, accounting for 150,000 deaths, and 25,000 cases of XDR. At the time, the WHO predicted there would be 2 million MDR or XDR cases in the word by 2012.

That was before TDR-TB.

The first cases, as it turns out, were not these Indian ones, but an equally under-reported cluster of 15 patients in Iran in 2009. They were embedded in a larger outbreak of 146 cases of MDR-TB, and what most worried the physicians who saw them was that the drug resistance was occurring in immigrants and cross-border migrants as well as Iranians: Half of the patients were Iranian, and the rest Afghan, Azerbaijani and Iraqi. The Iranian team raised the possibility at the time that rates of TDR were higher than they knew, especially in border areas where there would be little diagnostic capacity or even basic medical care.

The Indian cases disclosed before Christmas demonstrate what happens when TB patients don’t get good medical care. The letter to CID describes the course of four of the 12 patients; all four saw two to four doctors during their illness, and at least three got multiple, partial courses of the wrong antibiotics. The authors say this is not unusual:

The vast majority of these unfortunate patients seek care from private physicians in a desperate attempt to find a cure for their tuberculosis. This sector of private-sector physicians in India is among the largest in the world and these physicians are unregulated both in terms of prescribing practice and qualifications. A study that we conducted in Mumbai showed that only 5 of 106 private practitioners practicing in a crowded area called Dharavi could prescribe a correct prescription for a hypothetical patient with MDR tuberculosis. The majority of prescriptions were inappropriate and would only have served to further amplify resistance, converting MDR tuberculosis to XDR tuberculosis and TDR tuberculosis.

As their comment suggests, the other TB challenge is diagnosis, especially of resistant strains, and here again the news is not good. The WHO said last spring that only two-thirds of countries with resistant TB epidemics have the lab capacity to detect the resistant strains. As a result, only one MDR patient out of every 10 even gets into treatment, and when they do, cure rates range from 82 percent down to 25 percent. That’s for MDR. None of the TDR patients have been recorded cured, and at least one of the known Indian patients has died.

Meanwhile, health authorities estimate that one patient with active TB can infect up to 15 others. And thus resistant TB spreads: XDR-TB was first identified just in 2006, and it has since been found in 69 countries around the world.

Cite: Zarir F et al. Totally Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in India. Clin Infect Dis. advance access Dec. 21, 2011.  doi: 10.1093/cid/cir889.

Jan 8, 2012
7 notes

(Source: ord3rlychaos)

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